Product Catalog

Description
Deep rooted, short-lived perennial, having finer stems and more leaves than alfalfa. Grows 12 to 30 inches tall, depending on whether it is a prostrate or erect variety.
Deep rooted, short-lived perennial, having finer stems and more leaves than alfalfa. Grows 12 to 30 inches tall, depending on whether it is a prostrate or erect variety. Flowers are bright yellow and the brown to purple seed pods radiate from the stem branch, resembling a bird's foot. Non-bloating legume. Reseeds under proper management. Major uses are for pasture, erosion control. High quality forage. Seed are planted at 4 to 6 lb/A with cool season perennial grasses using a cultipacker-seeder in late August-September.

Rates

Please contact us for current pricing and availability.

Description
Crown vetch, a member of the pea family, is a perennial herb with creeping stems that may reach two to six feet in length.
Crown vetch, a member of the pea family, is a perennial herb with creeping stems that may reach two to six feet in length. The compound leaves bear 15 to 25 leaflets. The pealike, pink to white flowers occur in clusters at the end of extended stalks. The narrow, leathery seed pods may be 2 to 3 inches long. The following three characteristics together distinguish crown vetch from other legumes: 1) its compound leaves have an odd number of leaflets, 2) the leaves and flower stalks arise from the main stem, and 3) the flowers occur in a radiating cluster known as an umbell.

Rates

Please contact us for current pricing and availability.

Description
Both Purple Bounty and Purple Prosperity are winterhardy, earlier maturing hairy vetch varieties developed for high nitrogen fixation (up to half of a subsequent crop's nitrogen), increased biomass for a thicker mulch and earlier flowering for more flexibility in planting succeeding crops.
Both Purple Bounty and Purple Prosperity are winterhardy, earlier maturing hairy vetch varieties developed for high nitrogen fixation (up to half of a subsequent crop's nitrogen), increased biomass for a thicker mulch and earlier flowering for more flexibility in planting succeeding crops. Purple vetch forms ground cover slowly in the fall, but root development continues through the winter with substantial growth in the spring. For maximum results, purple vetch should be in full bloom to allow for peak nitrogen contribution and to mow, roll or spray for maximum vetch kill. Spring oats or winter grains can also be planted with purple vetch to act as a protective cover for improved winter survival and increased erosion control. Plant 20 to 25 lbs. per acre.

Rates

Please contact us for current pricing and availability.